Edtech Insiders

Postcards from StartEd's NY Edtech Week

October 12, 2022 Alex Sarlin Season 3 Episode 22
Postcards from StartEd's NY Edtech Week
Edtech Insiders
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Edtech Insiders
Postcards from StartEd's NY Edtech Week
Oct 12, 2022 Season 3 Episode 22
Alex Sarlin

In this episode, we talk to some of the standout stars of the StartEd New York Edtech Week conference.

  • Sari, Kide Science (story-based early years learning with platform for educators from Finland!)
  • Nikita Gupta, Symba (internship and apprenticeship management)
  • Matthew Evans, Julius (job training for green economy jobs) 
  • Rachel Jordan, TeachFX (measuring pedagogical 'talk' in the classroom)

Warning: This was a crowded event, and the audio quality of the interviews can be spotty at times. 

Show Notes Transcript

In this episode, we talk to some of the standout stars of the StartEd New York Edtech Week conference.

  • Sari, Kide Science (story-based early years learning with platform for educators from Finland!)
  • Nikita Gupta, Symba (internship and apprenticeship management)
  • Matthew Evans, Julius (job training for green economy jobs) 
  • Rachel Jordan, TeachFX (measuring pedagogical 'talk' in the classroom)

Warning: This was a crowded event, and the audio quality of the interviews can be spotty at times. 

Welcome to Season Two of edtech insiders, where we talk to the most interesting thought leaders, founders, entrepreneurs, educators and investors driving the future of education technology. I'm your host, Alex Sarlin, an edtech veteran with over 10 years of experience at top edtech companies. Welcome to Ed Tech insiders, we've got a really special very unusual and unique episode for you today. It's going to be a roundup of two different amazing tech events. Three, in fact, two in New York and one in California. Ben, what are the events that we're rounding up today? Well, the week that was it was New York Ed Tech Week, and it was so great to connect and see so many people. At the last minute, I wasn't able to make it. So Alex, you've been our resident expert on New York ed tech week. And then on the West Coast, we have the Stanford learning accelerator conference, bringing together big names like Sal Khan, and also the entrepreneurial community together to think about how to transform learning, you know, the whole on IQ event, the startup event in New York, what were some highlights before we jump into the interview? Like what was your experience? Like, Alex? Yeah, it was amazing. So the Ed Tech Week event is sort of run by started, which is an accelerator out of New York, that's been going for a while has really great, you know, connections with people in the industry, it was a really amazing event, I spent a lot of it doing interviews with various entrepreneurs, which you'll hear in this episode. So I didn't get to see a whole lot of the actual stage sessions. But the energy there was incredible people were so excited to, you know, be back in person, see, the people they've been zooming with, for the last year, connect with investors connect with other entrepreneurs connect with teachers, it was really like the sort of inspirational value of an event like that was enormous. Even the sort of floor where you have the vendors who are sort of showcasing their products, which some conferences, that's not always a very thrilling part of the event, you'd walk through there and come out with like, wow, you know, just be like, these were some seriously good ideas. I think there's just a lot of momentum in the space. It was really fun in the whole queue event, much more formal, mostly for investors. It's the it was the first of the impact summit that Holan IQ does, as they go around the world. This was a kickoff in New York and other going to Mexico, they're going all through Europe and Latin America. And they announced the North America 200 companies that edtech companies, which you know, will link to in this episode, that was an exciting moment. There's also a lot of talk about SR funding, which is really interesting, obviously, very important for the next, you know, two, three years for the entire ed tech community. A lot of talk about workforce development and pathways, alternative credentials, I saw that, you know, the head of GA head of nerdy that, you know, Chip Pasek, from to you. And Jeff magazine called up from Coursera, a lot of really interesting talks from some of the sort of public ed tech companies about this moment and where it's all going. So I thought it was great. Then what are you seeing in California? What's been on your mind this week? Well, at the Stanford Transforming Learning accelerator event, it's the kind of meeting of Silicon Valley research at Stanford, and practitioners. And so it's a great gathering point, I think, you know, the vibe is very similar. You know, we often talk on the podcast around, you know, the market and the kind of Ed Tech winter that has kind of come upon us. But all in all, the energy is really positive and upbeat around the potential for impact and transformation. And I would also say this idea of cross functional cross sector partnerships is really gaining a lot of momentum. The idea that, you know, venture capitalists might team up with philanthropy might team up with public and entities, I think we are seeing a lot of those lines drop. Without further ado, though, we should jump into our postcards, what you should know about our postcard segments. We also did this at ASU GSB their brief snippets so you get a sense of what it's like to be at the conference hearing from the different voices and we'll be back with our regular episode next week, talking about our top five and with our interviews. So without further ado, here we go. Across the ocean so you really have to start from the stories. I think it's also like, you are doing your job selling stories and that's what's more interesting. So that's why we Start every lesson with a story story you can think everything outside we actually have a platform for 30 years education teachers are no screen for a lesson plan in a nutshell the teachers and educators too first of all you needed that they can't sit in a classroom so there's no expensive supplies or any boxes you have to order to deliver. So we want to make sure that you would set up an activity there is a story that you read there is a positive character trouble which is easier for the children to then do something so they're helping to find out for example, how to rainbows for without having for coding so you have some kind of activities problem solving and when they figure out how to report back science this year I think the biggest thing why education is so good is that we find the teachers teachers can really choose everything they want to do with the children is a parent I have to I never go to you have to use these principles teachers also the other one is that the teachers don't do a lot of Assessment and Testing so they don't do the assessments it's more about what are the outcomes here now I really hope that it's not only about it's about learning skills that are a little bit opposite approach to relationships Yes, so at the moment anybody has a teacher whoever so they can start using offering for free forever if they want that full access to all the library features we the pricing of course it's possible as well as the money more than we have. To Any teacher sounds like this is a really interesting experience it's a recent partnership actually works on Imation contacted last year and they were looking for high quality for example mitigation content for their animation series. So they have this series they wanted us to create we started to talk about we are like open to the different types of partnerships other companies a couple of final questions tell us about the founding team together yes so when I was working for big corporations for two babies in a row I felt like I really don't they were looking at free ladies we have to do this I actually heard from one of the members we have research so we really user studies so, I think that's fine but also because we are not setting these takes time for money or the hospital response from well actually that was something that we don't but then when we started in us doing Facebook advertising we actually found out quite soon and we asked like why did you sign up? We are really, really good. Interesting repeat the same thing there's no difference yeah it's not that we have made this or any article it's like we are the lucky seeing for example we really like so interesting I love this teacher trust teachers and they will bring the Best New York City to meet people in person get the meeting amazing also here in New York City there thanks so much for being here. We're here with Chrissy McCann, Flim and Jeffrey from go coach. Welcome. Thank you for having me. Tell us a little bit about go coach. You guys have been winning Shark Tank competitions here. What's it all about upscaling employees, former HR executive 20 years at companies like yours in education many more are we gotten into this vise where we have a skill shortage, it's a war on talent, the great resignation. And now recession. People don't have the skills they need to be able to do their job. So we created this all on talent, learning data and unlimited data, jobs, their jobs. And you are doing this partially by connecting them with qualified coaches tell us about the coach, the pool of coaches you have and how you make sure that they're qualified. Coaches are part of the personalized learning. So everybody, very easy. Getting feedback from managers and stakeholders as to how they're progressing and where they need to do you guys have worked with W GU Labs, which is one of our favorite accelerators. What is the relationship between go codes and businesses and universities? It's a great question. So WG labs, actually one of our first semesters, they took great chances because they saw the need, especially within non traditional online universities, OPM, a lot of these employees are in the workforce, and how do they further their career readiness. So not only is early investor and we're also a client, where we have access to over 250,000 alumni that provide them the upscaling that they need. You know, we're in this moment when so many people are questioning the ROI of higher ed, and they really want that over 90% Are there because they want to get a meaningful job? I'm curious how you see go coach's role in the future as sort of helping people learn at any age, when they're at that moment where they need to sort of change careers to bring coaching into the conversation. I think higher ed and you know, there's a little bit of misunderstanding, right, they find a lot of they provide a lot. But it's about how you apply it. You gotta learn about you know, what, and how do you apply to the workforce. So we're bringing that connection, your application and connecting their curriculum with our content with our CIO. walk us through what a typical coaching session might look like for a business start with all employees. So I hear a lot about the personalization. And it really does feel like the coaches are going to be able to customize the curriculum and customize how they work for every individual. You mentioned, it's also blended. I'd love to hear a little bit about the blended section of focus. Yeah, so when you look at all the learning development tools out there, they're very fractured, and they're very monolithic. You have like, you know, tons of content, but it's like versus our borders that apply. So that data, you know, not like NASA coaches with the content comes in as a reinforcement to really get to that relatability application and reinforcement. It takes five to seven times just for somebody to hear something, nevermind why it's over making sure it's asynchronous. And it really meets people where they're at, and they get the Outcome Set. Right. So the budget is the live coaching sessions and the reinforcement learning that happens between the sessions. And that makes a lot of sense. So you know, we're here in New York and tech week here in New York City based company. Oh, no, you're not? Where are you out of now. So we started in New York City or scaling in Philadelphia. But we're remote team, we have people in Florida, Michigan, Illinois, Texas, why? The jump is in New York City here. But it's great to be back in here. Especially our live events. This is like a little bit surreal. Yeah, you're pitching here in ed tech week, it's a quite a scene, I hope there's not too much background noise. What has been most exciting for you, as you've been building go coach, in talking to your b2b clients, what did they you know, what sort of gets their eyes to really light up about this coaching solution. I think what's most important, and I say this, as a former buyer, too, I used to buy a lot of learning and sound on the platforms and nobody would use. What gets me very excited is that we're making money off of people using our platform and getting alerted that they are adoption rates are ridiculously high, close to 90%. And usually it's about 5% in the market. And so they're getting the learning they're applying and it's working. And it doesn't stop, we make it very Evergreen. And that's the other thing, we elevate platforms out there, outside of making money off with people not learning there are very evergreen data continues to guide you to the next curriculum. That's really interesting. So what do you attribute that 90% to Is it because it's a live person, there's this feeling of relationship and accountability. And, you know, it's not a video solution. I think that that's an opponent of it. But, you know, the reason I brought Jeff in is that Jeff has tons of experience within education, higher ed, ah, well, and it's really about igniting the learner to get to that product like rope, along with the overall engagement, like an AMI, that usability that finesse to it. Like it's about, you know, being and wanting to be engaged, wanting to do this combination of personalization that, I think is absolutely right. I would add to that, in terms of In addition, we also make sure that we're not adding work to either it or hrs plates. So as a product guy, like I get excited about trying to build a very simple, easy to use workflow so that we can get people in and up and running. So adopting go coach doesn't become some implementation project, something that's scheduled for, you can actually see the value. And that's gonna continue to be our focus. You know, I've worked for a long time in ad tech. But I've also been a manager and I've used a lot of those crappy solutions, too. So I look at this too, from the perspective of my experience, like, what would I want to use? What's also exciting as our customers are helping to open our eyes to how we're going to help them in other ways, right? So a typical Adoption Model might be to offer coaching employees or to support the cohort that they want to move through. We Leadership Development. But what they're seeing and we are to how we can support them throughout the employee lifecycle. Fantastic. So go coach personalized blended learning for both businesses and higher ed, using qualified coaches through the IFC qualified coaches. I hope you guys have an amazing conference. That sounds really exciting. And good luck with your pitch today. Thank you so much. Take care. We're here at ed tech week with Matthew Evans from Julius Matthew, great to be here with you. It's great to be here. Thanks for having me. So tell us about what Julius Julius was solving. So today, there's 10s of millions of jobs in the economy, leading up to 9 million US alone, right now, that have not been enough solutions to get the workforce. Because, frankly, as much technology as we want, if you don't have the workforce. So if a learner comes to Julius, what are they looking to learn about the green economy to train? There's really three pillars that are critical. First, is to mystify. There's way too big a gap between interested in green jobs, and those who actually understand them. And the corresponding second is to provide industry lines, skills, training, industry certifications. And third is placement, placement to jobs across the economy. I would imagine that a lot of people, especially maybe younger people would be very interested in how to enter the green economy. Where do you find your users? Do you have partnerships? Or how do you get people to learn about Julian, one of the things that is particularly special about the economy is that there are jobs and career paths for. So there are tons of wonderful jobs that say you have a college degree. There are also amazing career paths, if you don't, one of our most important partnerships is with the GED, where we are for the first time for their community to 2000, high school graduates, waiting pathways to employment, the stem base jobs, good paying jobs and pathways, we keep making north of $100,000 a year without ever having to go get their four year degree. So the GED relationship is important for us. But it's really more indicative. In fact, this is a very big change in the economy, with jobs and careers. That's fascinating. So tell us a little bit about some of these different industries, which industries you in that trade associations do you work with? And what types of jobs are we talking about? It was important to understand that the green economy is not one thing. There are a number of different verticals within the green economy, each with their own workforce needs certification. Our work today includes work in green buildings, which is a massive sector, huge contributor to carbon emissions. If we don't get that right, as a country or globally, we're not gonna solve it. We also do a lot of work in the utility world, which is a massive dependency to ensure we electrification. More broadly, we have industry partnerships, with a major Association and systems level players across each of these areas. And we're adding some of our systems level partners include organizations like EPA, which whose members represent 90% of the revenue for the electric utility. Also organizations like CWD, the Center for Energy workforce development, organization in Denver, where we work with buildings, and this goes on and on. These are really important players, if we're going to solve climate, need to work with and assistance. I would imagine that many different government entities you just mentioned, Denver would be really interested in building a green workforce, especially if, as you say, many of these jobs do not require a bachelor's degree, it could be really transformative. How have you worked with governments? Well, we've certainly seen as with a bipartisan infrastructure, and with the IRA, that there is massive attention now being focused to say that technology alone is not going to solve. We also have a massive dependency on people. We need people to build and manufacture the technologies to install them to fix and maintain them when they break. So we have seen that Richmond Lorge at the federal level, we're also seeing that state and local level as well. So for instance, we work through the city of Denver, Denver, very focused on its green workforce, it's a booming town. It just doesn't have the people it needs, particularly in green buildings. Julius is working to build that talent pipeline for the city of Denver, in that vertical. It's so interesting. So when people come and get these industry certifications, where do they have to take them to be able to actually get placed into a job? Do you help them with actually landing the job as well as getting certified? We do so we build out the employer network for them to land jobs once they're through the Julius program. And the reality is that many of these Boys are desperate for, for talent 85% of energy companies today cannot get the talent today. And that's even before the 9 million new green jobs projected over the next decade in the US. So we exist to solve that game for the employers, but also we exist for the simple reason that without the right people, we're not gonna solve climate. It's not just a technology. It's so interesting. So, you know, working with governments makes a ton of sense, working with businesses makes a ton of sense. I'm curious if you've gotten any incoming interest from individuals who hear about this and say, wow, you know, I didn't realize there all these jobs in the green economy. Do you envision any kind of b2c play? We do. At this point, what we focus on is our partnership networks. They have a great handle on folks who are hungry for careers and getting into jobs now and looking for work. But we certainly see an opportunity for a b2c model, where we, we always are focused on trying to do is removing any kind of friction for people to enroll, whether they find a student, BBC channel, or through a Partner Network. And so our programs are free for learners to participate. We got to do just getting into job as a foothold into starting a career. Do you ever envision working with University Career Centers for those jobs that do require another great example of partnership? Working with the systems to achieve scale would be a crowd or even close to the board? It's so interesting. So we're here in New York, it is that it's probably a lot of background noise here. We're surrounded by people having conversations. What is it been like opening up and running an ed tech startup in the New York City scene, I have to say it is so fun to be here. Things really feel like they're back in post COVID world see people have not seen sometimes up to two plus years. So have on together again, feels very, very energizing. And it's great to be back. It's fascinating. So Matthew Evans from Julius doing green economy training, placement exploration, working with Denver the GED. Thanks so much for being here. It's a really interesting thing that you're doing very unique. Thanks so much for having me Alex. We're here with Nikita Gupta from Simba internship thank you so excited to be here. So So are Simba not for the Lion King but for symbiotic relationships. And we're helping organizations manage their early talent programs starting with internships bringing all in one internship manager all in one class. So we come into play after an after a company has hired all of their insurance. So everything from the day that they sign their offer letter for the internship, engaging them, managing their projects, tracking their feedback and performance and allowing them to connect with other interns and managers as what our platform does. It helps companies understand the ROI of their programs helps them with better conversion rates and diversifying their talent pipeline. And then for the insurance. It gives them a really great experience and a one stop shop for their internship program. Internship projects experience what does it do? One of the most exciting parts about our customers using Simba is actually watching their programs grow year after year. We've had companies who have been able to scale their programs over six times, and not only injustice summer but they're now hiring interns all year round so they can be on a part time basis. And also internships is not just restricted to college students. It can be high school students, moms who are trying to get back into the workforce veterans as well just to name a few. So seeing them grow, seeing them able to diversify and tap into geographies that they weren't able to access before has been incredibly exciting. Selected? Weather, the weather the insurance. So conversion rates and engagement scores are the top two metrics. They're tracking how often the intern is engaging with their managers. They're engaging with the events that are happening, interacting with other interns in the program, collecting feedback and improving their performance throughout all their projects at They're assigned is they're able to track that and understand that the intern is always positive is progressing. That means they can assign a happiness or sentiment score. And that allows them to understand the likelihood of extending them an offer to come back for full time and the possibility of them even accepting that offer come back for full time. Conversion rates is number one. And also we're seeing a talent war out there, interns can get the full time offer, but there is a six month lag most of the time, or even a one year gap between the internship completion and then the day that they come back for full time. So how do you keep those interns excited? How do you prevent them from being nagging and joining another company, so a lot of our tools help them keep them engaged all year round outside of the program. And then given the data that they need to measure not only the success of that student, but overall how successful their programs are. We've heard great things about it. So far, this product is so easy to use, it's allowed them to really effectively cut down a lot of time cut down a lot of manual processes, track all the data in one place, have something to show their leadership to how successful their programs are. And because of that, they're scaling. They're offering more positions for interns, and they're effectively able to bring them on as full time leaders and nurture them earlier on instead of having to spend a lot more time and resources going the traditional route of recruiting companies. We are industry agnostic, so pretty much any company that works with their insurance on a computer, so you can imagine medical or construction, kind of being out of the option. But we've seen great success in pharmaceutical, healthcare, FinTech, education, technology, retail, and so much more. In this environment. Companies are really valuing early talent programs, because they're understanding the impact that the students can make. It not only is a more efficient way of hiring full time, but it's a most effective way of diversifying your leadership and a full time employee workforce at the company. So we, you know, not going to lie, there's definitely been some companies who've had to cut back their internship programs due to budget concerns and constraints. But we work with customers who are really excited about internship programs, and they're using them as a great way to hire back into the full time workforce. So 40% of all internships are unpaid Believe it or not, Simba does not support unpaid internships, we only work with organizations that pay their interns. We believe it's completely unfair to not pay your interns for the hard work they're doing. Even sometimes college credits aren't sufficient. So yeah, we don't even engage with unpaid internship programs. And we actually actually currently have a pledge going on with companies. We have many companies who are part of that pledge to promise that they're paying their interns at least $15 An hour and supporting the interns and you know, valuing the work that they're contributing to the company. Versus diversity inclusion is a big point of consideration for a lot of large organizations. So the fact that programs can be hybrid or remote means that companies can now hire talent from untapped geographies. And because they're able to bring on so many students and scale their programs, that means that they're starting off with a diverse workforce. One of the metrics or some of the metrics that our customers are collecting are the different backgrounds different pronouns, genders, location, educational background, to help them add to the diversity metrics. Definitely, it's so key it's helping HR leadership understand who they're going to be hiring and bringing back on as full time. Internships, actually, sim is going to change internships and flip it over time. Internships are not just a traditional go into the office. Whereas to 12 weeks summer, sweating in the summer program, it's going to be all year round, it's going to be these professional experiences that, again, to what I alluded earlier, it's not just college students, it's anyone who's trying to get a taste of the professional world are trying to get back into the workforce. So companies were really excited about these kinds of programs, whether they call it apprenticeships, internships, rotational programs, we definitely see a lot of that happening more and more, because it's a great way to diversify the talent pipeline, and an easier way to hire full time is really getting all your you mentioned the word apprenticeship, or maybe a blurry line between internship where you're doing it's really exciting. week in New York City. Tech Week really shows us that there is a list, there are endless opportunities to partner and integrate with other solutions in the same space. So first of all, it's been awesome meeting other entrepreneurs who are tackling very similar problems and who are day by day night by night working to just make the world a better place. Secondly, it's been awesome to see that there are a lot of mentors and investors who are really excited about education, technology, and are putting in a lot of resources to help companies that are early stage really grow and flourish. And lastly, even just by meeting a handful of other entrepreneurs in the last couple of days, I already have ideas of how I want to integrate with other tools, bring them onto Simba and just kind of make you know all of our experiences better and bring together this community and integrator technologies together. Thank you so much. Tech, we're here with Rachel Jordan, the head of marketing effects welcome, I think so much for being here with us. Give our listeners overview of the new way to think about providing instructional leadership primarily that uses AI technologies to help teachers student talk dynamics. They record a lesson just kind of audio. And they get to see things like what kind of academic vocabulary? Are their students using teacher talk students? What's happening? And then also really important teaching practices. Like, am I using wait time? Am I asking open ended questions? What are the longest stretch students, teachers? And then when you have all of those personalized kind of becoming your own instruction, to me, teacher, teachers. Experience I love that phrase, a culture of conversation sounds like one of the things that you're doing with teacher Flex is bringing a type of data that isn't usually accessible to most people into the conversation, which is exactly the words that are being said, you can see which students are talking how much they're talking what they're saying what you're saying is a teacher, what are some of the biggest insights that teachers find out when they get this database? That's exactly right. We envision a world where we actually shift the conversation about what data matters and teachers upwards 40 hours a year focusing on looking at assessment outcomes data comes through. There's actually no data that shows which is learning outcomes. So when teachers have access to this data, we have a view of what's happening. We will often hear from teachers have no idea how much they go through. What's happening, how am I teaching? My students experience and maybe one thing that's really powerful. I want to use wait times. They can teach us a lesson a week later and see immediately. It's a completely different way of thinking got data? incredibly interesting, and what are some of the ways that you visualize data for your teachers in ways that they can sort of pretty quickly digested, make sense and adapt? So the thing that people love the most, I think it's the word cloud. conversation happened once you recognize your voice versus your students, and we deliver this word that shows, what were the words that you use? And what were the students can imagine, especially in science, where the vocabulary really, really does show. How, what do I need to show matters? So we'd love to talk about ping pong, volleyball conversation. Very simple. Ask the teacher, am I falling into the teacher? student teacher student? Because I would have wanted in my lesson, or did I want? Or am I following volleyball, setting up that bar for the students and then letting them build on each other? Incredibly, you know, I imagined that your teach effects was originally built for in person classrooms. But we are in a moment of a lot of remote teaching. I'm curious how affected by that change? That's very true. Yes, we have evolved really quickly alongside all the teachers who are evolving in their classrooms every day. So we're originally as soon as all our schools with virtual, our team builds really robust, actually helped us get towards our mission even faster. And with our zoom integration, we were able to start showing teachers even more clearly, students voices are showing the largest study in classrooms, districts level, data, demographic data, to really show district level, who's getting what can we do? There's tons of data out there on why it matters, to ensure that want to make sure. You know, I'd imagine that that type of data might be incredibly eye opening for teachers. Everybody who's ever sat in the classroom knows that, you know, a few students tend to take up a lot of their time, the teacher themselves, usually talks more than they want to, but seeing that in cold, hard data, how many people are talking and maybe even broken down by the students background? is a really eye opening experience. What have you heard from the teachers who see this data? What do they tend to? Overall, whether they're teaching virtually, or in person, teachers definitely recognize that their assumptions of what's happening in the classroom aren't always the same as the reality. And of course, possible to have a full picture of what happens during that lesson. There's so many things happening. They're all numbered from one second to the next. So whether you have someone observing yourself afterwards, whether you're looking at comments was that really asking open ended questions? I was really asking a lot of students, and all of a sudden they're starting to examine assumptions and biases. It's really interesting. So you mentioned open, closed ended questions is one example of where the AI can actually identify certain types of transcript from a recording. I'm curious if there are others either now or on the horizon. signals that teachers can use. We focus on open ended questions, closed questions, use of wait time, one at a time, after time. Really powerful. This conversation every insight provides for teachers is based in research. So you're very grounded in decades of research. practices. So the data that is coming out of the classroom, we're talking about recordings in the classroom and then breakdowns of who's speaking and everything that would be incredibly teacher. Are there other stakeholders who might get school districts, parents, curious if others sort of request that information, and how you think first and foremost, teachers believe that, in order to improve their own teaching practice, teachers need to have non evaluative job and private choose to share it, and a lot of teachers will share it, bring it to a PLC, bring it to professional learning, they may bring it to their coach, it's not an expectation we do. District district leaders are providing when we roll up that data for us. Really big district superintendent as important as when you mentioned, you know, they set a goal to increase student talk district wide. That's such an interesting thing to hear. I think that is a metric we don't often hear in education, I'd love to but you mentioned earlier that students who talk clear correlation. So I'd love to understand if a district has learning goals or equity goals, how they can use that sort of, as a sub goal towards towards equity or learning. So the first thing is that can't be one more. We often talk about how difficult it is at the district level or the school level. And it's because we think about change as something that's new things being layered on top of one more thing is there's going to be one more thing I have to pile on. For us this is about integrating priorities. So integrating into your instruction, integrating it into that curriculum. We partner with curriculum leaders who are building curriculum built around the missing piece, teach your teachers how to use it, and do amazing professional learning sessions to get them excited about using this curriculum in their classroom. But then, the missing piece that helps teachers see what's actually not one thing that strikes me about teacher, teacher training programs, especially some really sophisticated ones, are really focused on this kind of thing. They record these sort of master lessons and break them down and use them as exemplars for other for other teachers. I'm curious if you've ever gotten any kind of requests to look at an exemplar, a really wonderful classroom where the talk is extremely volleyball or where the super 11 and you have many, many different voices. Do you ever hear that kind of question? Perfect example. That's a great question. I don't know if there's ever a perfect but we do have a lot of educators. So our educators have designed and delivered their demonstration lessons so you can see a full classroom. Listen back to the teacher, just like any other teacher might. And then we also see they mentioned teachers bringing their class reports. So one of my fav So he and his colleagues will teach the same lesson here and I got your what is the question? And they're really building on each other's learning just as we want to build on each other learning in a classroom. That's like a true teaching community of practice. That's really exciting to hear. One final question is we're sitting here at people all around us. What has been most exciting for you about this conference? It's really hard to pick just one thing. So I've been a mentor, but started for close to a year now and do these mentoring sessions every few months where I get to connect with entrepreneurs for 30 minutes at a time, but it's all been virtual. So it is so amazing to be here in this building full of people who are full of amazing ideas and doing new things to really innovate. The energy is incredible. There's, there's just endless possibilities. It really is a moment where sort of everywhere you look, somebody is doing. Interesting. It's been really exciting to be here. Thank you so much. I really appreciate you being here with us. Thanks for listening to this episode of edtech insiders. If you liked the podcast, remember to rate it and share it with others in the Ed Tech community. For those who want even more Ed Tech Insider, subscribe to the free ed tech insiders newsletter on substack.